What Are the Most Common Causes of a Swollen Eye Lid?

A swollen eyelid is more than just a cosmetic annoyance. It can also be a quite serious problem. It can be frightening, mainly if the swelling is severe enough to interfere with a person’s ability to see. At Melbourne, eye surgeons from Mornington Clinic have agreed to share their experience and advice so keep reading.

Do you ever experience having a swollen eye lid? Do swollen eyes make your life looks miserable and unhealthy? A swollen eyelid is more than just a cosmetic annoyance. It can also be a quite serious problem. It can be frightening, mainly if the swelling is severe enough to interfere with a person’s ability to see. At Melbourne, eye surgeons from Mornington Clinic have agreed to share their experience and advice so keep reading.

 

Swollen Eye Lid Causes

The swollen eyelid arises when there is swelling or extra fluid in the conjunction tissues around the area of the eye. Swollen eyes can or cannot be painful, and it affects both the upper and lower eyelids. It causes eye injuries or trauma, eye infections, and eye allergies. However, swollen eyes or inflammation of the eyelids can be a severe and sight-threatening problem such as ocular herpes, graves’ disease, orbital cellulitis and so on.

Having swollen eyes can probably treat the condition at home for a few days. However, some people prefer to have medical treatment as soon as possible so that they can get an accurate diagnosis and specific antibiotics. Furthermore, the following details are some causes of a swollen eyelid.

Swollen eyelid

  1. Stye. A stye is a type of infections that may result in a swollen eyelid. The usual kind of stye contaminates the tear glands that are located at the base of the eyelashes. It also occurs inside the eyelid due to infected oil glands. A stye usually begins as itchy, painful, red, swollen lumps. Over the period, a stye starts to resemble a pimple. Mostly the infection only affects a single oil gland and requires no treatment. Applying a warm compress can help with the pain. You can stop using eye products, such as contact lenses and makeup until the stye disappears. Also, never to pop the stye as this can spread the infection and damage the eye.
  2. Pink eye. Pink eye is also known as conjunctivitis. It is the inflammation of the eye that affects the thin tissue that lines the eyelid and eyeball. Some people with pink eye usually have red or pink eyeballs and can experience itching, pain, and swollen eyes. The most usual kind of conjunctivitis is a viral infection. However, it can also cause by a bacterial infection. Perfumes and contact lenses can occasionally bother the eye and cause conjunctivitis.
  3. Chalazion. It looks like a stye, but chalazion is not an infection. It occurs when an oil gland in the eyelid gets clogged. Most often, people who have one chalazion tend to get more and can grow quite large. However, it is rarely hurt. Using warm wrappings can help a chalazion rid more rapidly. When chalazion grows big, it interferes with eyesight and may become excruciating. The difference between a chalazion, a stye, or an eye infection is sometimes challenging to tell.
  4. Allergies. Other causes of a red, itchy, watery eyes accompany with a swollen eyelid, is allergy. Pollen, dust, and other usual allergens can bother the eyes that triggers an allergic reaction. Swollen eyes that cause from allergies are infrequently risky but are bothersome. Some people get comfort from taking antihistamines, like Benadryl. Eye drops are also available both online and over-the-counter.
  5. Exhaustion. Fatigue or exhaustion can make the eyelids swollen and puffy. Water retention overnight can also affect the eyelids. It can make them look swollen and puffed in the morning, particularly if the person did not sleep well. Cold compress while lying with the head elevated on a pillow may help. Drinking a glass of water may also help reduce fluid retention and swelling.
  6. Crying. Strenuous crying can break tiny blood vessels in the eyes and eyelids. Swollen eyelids that occur after a person has been crying can be the result of fluid retention, which is caused by the increase in blood flow to the area around the eyes. You can rest, cold compresses, elevating the head, and drinking water may help
  7. Cosmetics. When skincare and makeup products enter into the eyes, they can displease the eyes and the tissue around it, resulting in a red, swollen, painful mess. Sensitive responses to these products can also activate swollen eyelids. If people experience red-hot and swollen eyes, they can use eye drops that are available online and at the drugstore, to help soothe the discomfort.
  8. The blocked tear ducts. The eye cannot completely clear out the tears when the tear duct is clogged. It can result in agony and soreness on the eyelid. girl with swollen eyelidMost newborns and infants are particularly susceptible to this type of swelling of the eyelid. Generally, a blocked tear duct is bothersome but not detrimental. Applying warm compresses can help to lessen the swelling and help the tear duct drain. Massaging the area can help to reduce pressure and drain the duct.
  9. Orbital cellulitis. It is an infection deep in the tissue of the eyelid. It can spread quickly and is often extremely painful. Even a small cut can provoke the germs to trigger orbital cellulitis. If the lid is very hurtful, sore, or inflamed, a person must have an emergency medical care.
  10. Graves’ disease. Graves’ disease is an endocrine disorder that causes an overactive thyroid. This ailment can cause the thyroid to incorrectly let go of the cells to fight an unreal infection in the eye. The antibodies it releases cause puffiness and inflammation in the eye. Thyroid surgery and various medications are available for Graves’ disease.

Always consult your eye doctor when the symptoms persist. Stop using things or products that can be the reason for having swollen eyes like putting makeup or contact lenses. Don’t wait to ease the swelling by doing nothing. Take a preventive measure, or you can go immediately to your doctor.

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